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1800 Years of Discovery! The Eye of the World is in Izmir…

Historical discoveries from Turkey, whose four corners are home to the legacies of many ancient civilizations, continue to come to light. Finally, the discovery made in the Ancient City of Metropolis in Torbalı district of Izmir excited even archaeologists. The head of the excavation in the ancient city, Prof. Dr. Serdar Aybek expressed his opinion on the discovery with the words “Something has made us very happy”. The 1800-year-old discovery is the first of its kind.

Those found in the excavations carried out in the Ancient City of Metropolis will shed light on history! A well was dug during the excavations in the ancient city. 150 amphorae and water jugs dating back to 1800 years were found in the well. Excavation Director Prof. Dr. Serdar Aybek shared the information that for the first time in Metropolis, amphorae and water jugs were found in bulk. Here are the details of the discovery that turned the eyes of the world to Izmir…

WORLD HISTORY IS ILLUMINATED IN IZMIR: 1800 YEARS OF DISCOVERY

Excavations carried out on behalf of the Ministry of Culture and Tourism in the Ancient City of Metropolis, known as the ‘City of the Mother Goddess’, between the Yenikoy and Ozbey neighborhoods of Torbali; It continues with the support of Izmir Metropolitan Municipality, Torbali Municipality and Sabanci Foundation.

The first traces of settlement in the Late Neolithic-Early Chalcolithic period in and around the ancient city, where excavations have been carried out since 1990; It is seen incessantly until the Archaic and Classical Ages, Hellenistic Period, Roman, Byzantine, Principalities and Ottoman periods.

REPAIR WORKS STARTED

In the ancient city, where many monumental structures were unearthed, this year’s excavations are being carried out around the Hellenistic Theater and the Roman Bath, which are among the most important structures of the city. During the excavations, amphorae and water jugs were found in Metropolis for the first time.

It was stated that most of the 150 amphorae and water jugs found, which were 1800 years old, were fragmented. Work has been started for the repair of fragmented amphora and jugs. It was noted that after the repair, the works will be delivered to the museum.

“FINE WORKMANSHIP”

Providing information about the excavations, conducting the excavation in the Ancient City of Metropolis, Manisa Celal Bayar University Archeology Department Lecturer Prof. Dr. Serdar Aybek said:
“Our excavation work in Metropolis is very productive. We are working on the Hellenistic and Roman period settlement of Metropolis. This year we cleaned the water well of the Roman Bath, which was found in previous years.

The structure is approximately 12 meters deep and has a fine workmanship. It was something that made us very happy. Especially in the last 2 meters of the well, we found many fragments of amphorae and water jugs belonging to the same period.”

“APPEARED FOR THE FIRST TIME IN METROPOLIS”

Pointing out that water wells are among the important finds in ancient cities, Aybek said:
“Similars can be found in surrounding cities such as Ephesus, but this is the first time that such amphora finds have been unearthed in Metropolis. These are probably artifacts that were broken while extracting water from the well, falling into the well and remaining in the mud.

The amphorae found are being restored by an expert team. After the restoration is completed, the amphorae will be delivered to the Izmir Archeology and Ethnography Museum to be exhibited.”

Conservation and repair specialist Taner Ozgur stated that they put together the amphora pieces found one by one like a jigsaw puzzle. Stating that they carried out meticulous work, Ozgur also drew attention to the importance of finds from the same period.

Ece Nagihan

Hello, I'm Ece, I write food ingredients for Expat Guide Turkey every day. Don't forget to check it out!

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