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World’s Largest Plant Discovered Off the Coast of Australia

The largest known plant in the world was discovered off the coast of Australia. The largest known plant in the world was discovered off the coast of Australia. Researchers estimate the age of the seagrass meadow, the size of 20,000 football fields, to be about 4,500 years. Geneticists point out that this great underwater meadow, which they researched for different purposes in Western Australia, is actually a single plant.

The plant is believed to have spread from a single seed at least 4,500 years ago. Researchers from the University of Western Australia say the seaweed covers an area of ​​about 200 square kilometers. He discovered the plant by accident. Their aim was to understand the genetic diversity of these grasslands, also known as “lane grass” (Posidonia australis), common on the Australian coast. The researchers collected shoots from one end of the bay and used 18 genetic markers, known as genetic markers, to create a “fingerprint” from each sample. They analyzed thousands of different DNA sequences. They aimed to find out how many plants the meadow consisted of.

Australia

Durability Takes Attention

“There was only one answer, and it surprised us,” said Jane Edgeloe, lead author of the study, published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The fact that it grows in very variable conditions along the bay also draws attention to the endurance of the plant. “It’s really resilient. It seems to live in extremely high light conditions with a wide temperature and salinity range. This actually creates quite stressful conditions for many plants,” said one of the researchers, Dr Elizabeth Sinclair.

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Gül Demirci

Hello, I am Gul, I write content for Expat Guide Turkey every day. Don't forget to check it out!

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